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Can support levels change with the number of children?

| May 27, 2021 | Child Custody And Support

If you are a parent or grandparent living in Texas trying to secure child support for minors in your care, you may struggle to make ends meet. This situation is particularly true if you’ve recently assumed care for an additional child. Texas child support guidelines often work in your favor.

Calculating payment amounts

Texas family law bases child support payments on a percentage of the income of non-custodial parents. To calculate a child support payment, Texas courts determine the net income of the non-custodial parent responsible for the support; in some cases, this can be both parents if you are a grandparent who has custody of grandchildren.

The courts base the net amount on the money remaining after Social Security, federal and state income taxes and, in some cases, expenses for health insurance for the children. The child support amount represents a percentage of that income and increases depending on the number of children that non-custodial parents are responsible for. That means if you are suddenly responsible for additional minor children, you are entitled to more child support under Texas law.

Standard support guidelines

Any money received from non-custodial parents must be used strictly for the benefit of that individual’s child or children. The percentage of a non-custodial parent’s income that Texas awards for child support is generally as follows:

  • One child: 20%
  • Two children: 25%
  • Three children: 30%
  • Four children: 35%
  • Five children: 40%

For more than five children, the designated amounts get tricky as the law states that it cannot be less than 40%. The rules become even trickier if a non-custodial parent has children from other relationships.

Confused about child support?

Many people are confused when confronted with Texas family law regarding increased child support when providing care for one than one minor. Specific rules can change due to new laws and other initiatives.

Working closely with an attorney on child custody and support issues may help you better understand child support percentages. An attorney may be able to help you get the amount of support to which you are entitled.